LMS CRIMSON PRINCE OF WALES AT CAMBRIDGE 1924

LMS CRIMSON PRINCE OF WALES AT CAMBRIDGE 1924

GICLEE PRINT OF DIGITALLY MODIFIED VERSION OF OIL-ON-CANVAS ORIGINAL PAINTING 

When the LMS inherited the "Prince of Wales" locomotives in 1924, they were performing front-line express passenger work all over the ex-LNWR lines.  This meant that they were prime candidates to be painted in the new LMS lined "Crimson Lake" passenger locomotive livery.  The ex-LNWR personnel at Crewe resisted painting locomotives in the new LMS crimson lake livery because it closely resembled the livery carried by their bitter rivals, the Midland Railway, before 1924.  As time went on, relatively few of the class got the LMS crimson livery, but the locomotive portrayed in this virtual image shows one of the first locomotives "Pegasus" to receive this fine livery.

The photograph:   This painting is inspired by a black and white photograph taken by Henry Casserley in the 1940s, with the kind permission of his son Richard Casserley, who holds the copyright for all the photographs taken by his father.

The painting:  In January, 1924, "Pegasus" received the new fully lined LMS crimson lake livery, and I have chosen to portray it in recently overhauled and newly painted condition.  Only about 20 out of 246 "Princes" eventually received the new livery, so it was not common to see these locomotive in this guise.  However, they did exist, and if one had visited Cambridge in 1924 to 1926, it would have looked much as I have portrayed in this digitally modified version of the original oil-on-canvas painting.

For those familiar with "Thomas the Tank Engine" stories, I believe that the Prince of Wales locomotives going through the transition from LNWR lined blackberry black livery to the new LMS crimson lake livery were the Reverend W.W. Audrey's inspiration to create "James the Red Engine".  "James"  was derailed in an accident and as a reward for bearing up so well, was repaired and repainted from a locomotive with lined black livery into a splendid red engine.  The Reverend W.W. Audrey was a young man during the 1924-28 period and would have observed these changes on the railways.  I think he remembered this episode during the transition from the LNWR to the LMS railways and used it years later to write about "James the Red Engine".


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Tags: historic, steam, railways, painting